Rainwater Tank Systems

Rainwater tank systems for urban water supply

There is a new rain tank book out:

Sharma, A., Begbie, D. and Gardner, T. (2015) Rainwater tank systems for urban water supply: design, yield, energy, health risks, economics and social perceptions.  IWA publishing.

The google books version is available here.

I contributed to two chapters.

Chapter 9: Chemical quality of rainwater in rain tanks.

Magyar, M. I. and Ladson, A. R. (2015) Chemical quality of rainwater in rain tanks. In: Sharma, A., Begbie, D. and Gardner, T. (2015) Rainwater tank systems for urban water supply: design, yield, energy, health risks, economics and social perceptions.  IWA publishing. pp 207-224.

Abstract

The number of rain tanks in urban areas is increasing rapidly and although most tank water is for non-potable use there are a large number of households where tanks supply water for drinking. Comparing tank water with drinking water guidelines shows that high lead concentrations and low pH are common issues. We identified 32 studies where elevated metals concentrations in tank water were of concern with lead being an issue in 31 of these studies. A meta-analysis suggests that, in urban areas in Australia, about 22% of tanks can be expected to provide water with lead concentrations that do not meet drinking water standards. The risk of lead contamination needs to be taken seriously and there are opportunities to improve water quality through treatment, by better maintenance and improved tank design.
Keywords – water quality, rain tanks, heavy metals, lead, water supply

Chapter 13: Impact of rainwater tanks on urban hydrology and stormwater quality

Burns, M. J., Ladson, A. R. and Fletcher, T. D. (2015) Impact of rainwater tanks on urban hydrology and stormwater quality.  In: Sharma, A., Begbie, D. and Gardner, T. (2015) Rainwater tank systems for urban water supply: design, yield, energy, health risks, economics and social perceptions.  IWA publishing. pp 301-314.

Abstract
Urbanisation alters catchment hydrology and receiving water quality. These impacts have been identified as primary stressors to urban stream ecosystems. The protection or restoration of urban streams requires approaches to stormwater management which focus on protecting or restoring natural flow and water quality regimes. Rainwater tanks have a major role to play in such approaches. They can reduce the frequency, magnitude and volume of urban stgormwater runoff delivered to streams. They can also improve stormwater quality. Other benefits of using rainwater tanks include: urban cooling and mitigation of urban flooding. This chapter describes the changes in stormwater quality and quantity due to rainwater tank implementation in urban landscapes.
Keywords – flow regime, harvesting, source-control, stormwater, retention waterway.

If you’d like copies of these chapters, please let me know: Email request

If you live in Australia and would like to buy a copy, there is a price comparison available from booko.com.au.  Otherwise, try Amazon

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